Assets of Community Value

The Localism Act 2011 introduces an important new power for local communities to protect buildings and open spaces they value. The Community Right to Bid came into effect on 21 September 2012. This is relevant to all civic societies and community groups.  

This new right means communities can ask their local council to list certain assets as being of value to the community. If an asset is listed and then comes up for sale, the new right will give communities that want it 6 months to put together a bid to buy it. This gives communities an increased chance to save much loved shops, pubs or other local facilities.

Parish councils or local community groups can nominate both privately and publicly owned assets which meet the definition of community value.

A building or land in your council’s area can be listed as an asset of community value if:

  • current primary use of the building/land or use of the building/land in the recent past furthers the social well-being or social interests (cultural, recreational, or sporting interests) of the local community
  • it is realistic to think that now or in the next five years there could continue to be primary use of the building/land which will further the social well-being or social interests of the local community (whether or not in the same way as before)

Owners of listed assets cannot dispose of them without:

  • letting the local authority know that they intend to sell the asset or grant a lease of more than 25 years
  • waiting until the end of a six week ‘interim moratorium’ period if the local authority does not receive a request from a community interest group to be treated as a potential bidder
  • waiting until the end of a six month ‘full moratorium’ period if the local authority does receive a request from a community interest group to be treated as a potential bidder

Get Involved

Localism Alliance

Civic Voice is a member of the Localism Alliance. The Alliance represents over 200,000 individuals and nearly 10,000 grassroots organisations.

Civic Voice, CAMRA, National Association of Local Councils, Plunkett Foundation, The Theatres Trust and Supporters Direct work together to help their members and communities embrace the powers available to them to protect local community assets.

What sort of things can be listed as an Asset of Community Value?

Although the Act notes that “social interests” includes “cultural, recreational and sporting interests” the phrase “social well-being” can apply to a much broader set of activities. Assets of Community Value might therefore include any land or building listed as below - although this is not meant as an exhaustive or definitive list.

This could include:

  • Shops
  • Pubs
  • Community/Village halls
  • Nurseries and children’s centres
  • Health centres, surgeries and hospitals
  • Sport, recreation and culture
  • Parks and open green spaces
  • Sports grounds
  • Theatres and cinemas
  • Swimming pools and lidos
  • Community services
  • Community centres
  • Youth centres

More information is available from the links on the left, or by contacting Civic Voice on info@civicvoice.org.uk