Making the most of successful appeals
Posted: 02 June 2010 09:53 PM   [ Ignore ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  3
Joined  2010-05-28

Having spent the morning at an appeal hearing, which I suspect will be dismissed by the Inspector, I am prompted to suggest that we might all try to make more of cases where arguments in favour of conservation and good quality architecture carry the day. What better way is there of deonstrating to the public, and to potential supporters, what we do?

Terence Bendixson
Hon. Sec. Planning
The Chelsea Society
020 7352 3885

 
 
Posted: 03 June 2010 09:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Newbie
Rank
Total Posts:  19
Joined  2010-04-17

Dear Terence,

Best of luck with opposing the appeal.

Without knowing anything about it I bet you win because if your planning authority is anything like ours they only refuse applications that they are 100% certain they will win on appeal (they actually win about 95%). This is why the whole planning process needs to be made fairer with equal right of appeal (it is now 2010 and the third millennium after all) for affected neighbours and the Chelsea Society etc so applications that the authority is not 100% sure about can be externally examined at appeal.

In my experience I am impressed by the professional approach of the planning inspectorate and one thing to make sure of is that they do a site visit. We had a great case where on the site visit the inspector noted a massive tree with preservation order on it that had been growing on the roadside for 100 years bang in the middle of the proposed new entrance to the dubious development. The developers architect said he had not put the tree on the plans because it was on the pavement and not on his clients land. The Inspector refused the appeal told the developers and their expensive team of planning consultants off for time wasting.

Third party rights of appeal are long overdue, discuss it with your members, encourage them to read my (and others) posting on it.

Best wishes

David

PS Perhaps architects should have to sign a statement of truth in connection with their plans, the actual heights of neigbouring buildings on drawings (another old trick – look the same till they are built!!  - Sorry could not measure as not my clients building) distance from the road etc.